Last edited by Kagacage
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

3 edition of Confederate view of the treatment of prisoners. found in the catalog.

Confederate view of the treatment of prisoners.

by Southern historical society

  • 187 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Southern historical society in Richmond .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States -- History -- Civil war, 1861-1865 -- Prisoners and prisons. [from old catalog]

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsJones, J. William 1836-1909, comp.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE611 .S7
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 p.l., [113]-330 p.
    Number of Pages330
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23409412M
    LC Control Number02000520

    Confederate View of the Treatment of Prisoners $ Add to cart; Defend Dixie: A Better Narrative for Confederate Heritage $ Add to cart; Dixie Rising: Rules for Rebels $ Add to cart; E.M. Bounds: The Man Whose Life of Prayer Inspired Millions $ Add to cart; Encyclopedia of Black Powder Artillery Projectiles – Vol. III. The "Selected Records of the War Department Relating to Confederate Prisoners of War, " (NARA M) is a collection consisting of bound volumes. The records are of Confederate prisoners of war and political prisoners confined in Union prisons. They consist mainly of registers and lists of captured soldiers and civilians. The records contain information such as names, rank, unit or.

    Images of volumes of Confederate Prisoners of War records, most of which are from the War Department's Office of the Commissary General of Prisoners. Others are from the Surgeon General's Office, a few Army commands and individual prison camps. The collection consists mainly of lists and registers and is part of RG , War Department Collection of Confederate Records.   Confederate prisoners' suffering and death were due to a number of factors, but it would seem that Yankee apathy and malice were rarely among them. In fact, likely the most significant single factor in Confederate (and all) prisoner mortality during the Civil War was the halting of the prisoner exchange cartel in the late spring of Price: $

    "The Confederate privateers is a book of action and adventure filled with stories of the Confederacy's privately armed ships and their sea battles with the Union. Called 'pirates' by the North, the South preferred to call them 'gentlemen adventurers', justly boasting of their exploits. Using naval war records and other archives, the author provides readers with an authentic description of the. Upon its publication in , Civil War Prisons immediately provoked controversy. The first authoritative study of both Southern and Northern wartime prison systems, the book exposed several myths, including the widely held assumption that Confederate leaders conspired to kill their prisoners through deliberate neglect. William Best Hesseltine demonstrated that the North shared responsibility.


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Confederate view of the treatment of prisoners by Southern historical society Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Confederate authorities always ordered the kind treatment of prisoners of war and if there were individual cases of cruel treatment it was in violation of positive orders.

The orders were to give prisoners the same rations that our own soldiers received and if rations were scarce and of inferior quality, it was through no fault of the Author: J.

William Jones. The Confederate authorities always ordered the kind treatment of prisoners of war and if there were individual cases of cruel treatment it was in violation of positive orders. The orders were to give prisoners the same rations that our own soldiers received and if rations were scarce and of inferior quality, it was through no fault of the Author: J.

William Jones, J. WIlliam Jones. Confederate view of the treatment of prisoners.: Compiled from offical records and other documents. Bringing Back the Black Robed Regiment – Book $ Add to cart; Calvanism and Evangelical Arminianism $ Add to cart; Childhood’s Songs of Long Ago $ Add to cart; Christ Our Penal Substitute $ Add to cart; Christian Consistency: The Formation of Character $ Add to cart; Confederaphobia.

An American Epidemic $ Full text of "Confederate view of the treatment of prisoners" See other formats. 27 rows  American Civil War Prison Camps were operated by both the Union and the Confederacy to.

Confederate View of the Treatment of Prisoners | This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. The murder of black POWs at Ft. Pillow led to a response by black soldiers to take no prisoners.

In Williams' view the "take no prisoners" attitude was an overall negative for the average Confederate soldiers. Black soldiers fought harder, and Confederate prisoners could expect no mercy.

While this book is interesting and is undoubtably well-researched, the author's tone can frequently be described as smug. Instead of merely presenting the facts as he has interpreted them, Gillispie spends an excessive amount of time pointing out the flaws in the research of his predecessors/5.

Register of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Citizens who Died in Federal Prisons and Military Hospitals in the North, ; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M, 1 roll); Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Record Group 92; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Search For Prisoners The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System currently includes information about two Civil War prisons: Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland, once a temporary home to more t Confederate soldiers; and Andersonville prison camp in Andersonville, Georgia, where more t Union soldiers were confined.

The Treatment Of Prisoners During The War Between The States. Compiled by Rev. Jones, Secretary of Southern Historical Society. There is, perhaps, no subject connected with the late war which more imperatively demands discussion at our hands than the Prison the Confederate Government should have been charged in the heat of the passions of the war with a systematic.

TREATMENT OF PRISONERS. In refutation of the charge that prisoners were starved, let it be noted that the Confederate Congress in May,passed a bill providing that the rations furnished to prisoners of war should be the same in quantity and quality as those.

How to Treat Rebel Prisoners. View on timesmachine. The South is as rife with horrible tales of ill treatment to her prisoners as the North is, and they are as great a drawback in. "While Pickett's division was before Newbern, General Pickett received by a flag of truce a letter from a gentleman in Boston, accompanied by a package of money containing $2, in which the writer stated he had a brother a Federal officer, in the Libby Prison; that his brother was a former comrade of Pickett in the Mexican war; and appealed to him, by the friendship of their old days, to.

Confederate prisons, however, did receive the greatest notoriety and even with the book’s Union bias, there is no denying that the images of the soldiers show how horrendous conditions were. The most infamous was Andersonville Prison in Georgia, where s Union prisoners of war died from starvation, malnutrition and disease.

The Confederate Reprint Company specializes in providing primary source literature relating to the Antebellum, War Between the States, and Reconstruction periods of American history. Our inventory of reprints of rare Confederate books and Southern history books is one.

of the largest on the Internet. We hope you enjoy your visit. During the Civil War, more Confederate soldiers died at Chicago’s Camp Douglas than on any battlefield. IT WAS FEBRUARYAND ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF CHICAGO, A SMALL CROWD GATHERED and watched anxiously as several thousand Confederate prisoners of war climbed out of a long string of the guard of Union soldiers, augmented by local police officers and volunteer.

Buy a cheap copy of Civil War Prisons book by William Best Hesseltine. For all the serious scholarship and popular writing devoted to the American Civil War, the topic of prisoner-of-war camps, more than any other, retains the feeling Free shipping over $Cited by: Washington: National Archives Microfilm Publications - Microcopy Selected Records of the War Department Relating To Confederate Prisoners of War - Vol 1 Records relating to all prisoners.

Register of prisoners compiled by the office of the Commissary General of Prisoners Civil War prison camps rolls of film. The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States.

[Compiled by Secretary of Southern Historical Society.] There is, perhaps, no subject connected with the late war which more imperatively demands discussion at our hands than the Prison the Confederate Government should have been charged in the heat of the passions of the war with a systematic cruelty to prisoners was.calf with gilt-lettered black morocco spine labels.

Light wear to head of spine, else a very good or better copy. Nevins II, p. "Mainly concerned with the deep commitment of Confederates to their cause and also Confederate treatment of prisoners and neutrals. ". At the very least, it appears that the Federal government endorsed a policy of retaliation for the poor treatment of Union prisoners in Confederate hands.

Secretary of War Stanton went on record, writing to Hoffman: “The Secretary of War is not disposed, in view of the treatment our prisoners are receiving, to erect fine establishments for.